Upcoming Webinar

When to Prescribe Advanced PAP Therapies for Patients Struggling with CPAP

  • Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018
  • Time: 12:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time
  • Duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes
Summary

When obstructive sleep apnea patients fail or can't adhere to the continuous form of positive airway pressure therapy (commonly known as CPAP), there are other options that clinicians should explore to get patients to adherence. In some cases, these other options include advanced positive airway pressure modes such as bilevel devices and adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV), which take into account such parameters as expiratory pressure intolerance. Learn what the literature says about these "rescue" devices as well as real-world approaches to switching patients to advanced therapies when indicated.

For more information and to register for the event, CLICK HERE

Recent Research: In the News

Pharmacotherapy Failure in Chronic Insomnia Patients



Published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Pharmacotherapeutic Failure in a Large Cohort of Patients With Insomnia Presenting to a Sleep Medicine Center and Laboratory: Subjective Pretest Predictions and Objective Diagnoses
  • Cognitive Behavioral Training to
    Implement the PAP NAP


    ONLINE TRAINING - CEU Offered

    Presented by Author and Sleep Specialist Barry Krakow, M.D.
  • IRT
    Imagery Rehearsal Therapy


    ONLINE TRAINING - CEU Credit Offered

    Presented by Author and Sleep Specialist Barry Krakow, M.D.
  • New Pathways for Chronic Insomnia
    Sleeping Pills or Sleeping Test?


    ONLINE TRAINING - CEU Credit Offered

    Presented by Author and Sleep Specialist Barry Krakow, M.D.

Nightmare Treatment Pearls and Possibilities


Dr. Krakow discusses Imagery Rehearsal Therapy and Nightmare Treatment

Sleep Apnea May Cause Nighttime Urination - KLTV 7 News Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |

kltvSUNDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- People who wake up during the night to urinate shouldn't automatically blame a urological problem. Sleep apnea, a breathing-related sleep disorder, could be the cause.

A new study suggests that nighttime urination, or nocturia, is comparable to loud snoring as a marker for obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which soft tissue in the throat blocks the flow of air into the lungs, disrupting sleep.

Previous studies established a link between nocturia and sleep apnea, a potentially serious condition that affects about 25 percent of U.S. men and 10 percent of U.S. women, the researchers said. But they believe this is among the first to show that screening for nocturia could help doctors identify patients with apnea.

The study also suggests that a common treatment for sleep apnea -- positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy -- can reduce symptoms of nocturia, thereby improving sleep and preventing debilitating falls among elderly people who get out of bed at night to use the bathroom.

PAP involves wearing a pressurized air mask while sleeping.

Typically, doctors screen for apnea by assessing patients' weight (the condition is associated with overweight/obesity) and asking if they snore heavily, notice breathing problems at night or feel tired during the day (because of interrupted sleep). But because many patients, especially those who sleep alone, are unaware that they snore, apnea often goes undiagnosed.

"When you ask people about symptoms like snoring and gasping, they tend to say, 'No, I don't have them'," said study author Edward Romero, research coordinator at the Sleep and amp; Human Health Institute in Albuquerque, N.M. "But it's very easy for them to realize that they wake up at night to go to the bathroom."

One of Romero's co-authors, institute director Dr. Barry Krakow, said doctors and patients are quick to blame nocturia on diabetes, prostate enlargement and other medical conditions with which it is associated.


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